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Marine Propellers and Propulsion, Fourth Edition, offers comprehensive, cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects or anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with essential job knowledge. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consulting, research, design and technical investigation, John Carlton examines hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance.

A propeller is a device with a rotating hub and radiating blades that are set at a pitch to form a helical spiral, that, when rotated, performs an action which is similar to Archimedes' screw. It transforms rotational power into linear thrust by acting upon a working fluid, such as water or air. A given mass of working fluid is accelerated in one direction and the craft moves in the opposite direction. Propeller dynamics, like those of aircraft wings , can be modelled by Bernoulli's principle and Newton's third law. The principle employed in using a screw propeller is derived from sculling.

Marine Propellers and Propulsion

By John Carlton. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Bringing together a wealth of disparate information from the field, Marine Propellers and Propulsion provides comprehensive and cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects and anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with the knowledge needed to do the job.

Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consultancy, research, design and technical investigation, author John Carlton breaks the subject into three main sections - hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance.

Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, Marine Propellers and Propulsion is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data. Both Archimedes c. In the case of Archimedes, his thinking centered on the application of the screw pump which bears his name and this provided considerable inspiration to the nineteenth-century engineers involved in marine propulsion.

Unfortunately, however, it also gave rise to several subsequent misconceptions about the basis of propeller action by comparing it to that of a screw thread. In contrast Leonardo da Vinci, in his sketchbooks which were produced some years after Archimedes, shows an alternative form of screw propulsion based on the idea of using fan blades having a similar appearance to those used for cooling purposes today.

The development of screw propulsion as we recognize it today can be traced back to the work of Robert Hooke, who is perhaps better remembered for his work on the elasticity of materials. Hooke in his Philosophical Collections , presented to the Royal Society in , explained the design of a horizontal watermill which was remarkably similar in its principle of operation to the Kirsten-Boeing vertical axis propeller developed two and a half centuries later.

During his life Hooke was also interested in the subject of metrology and in the course of his work he developed an air flow meter based on the principle of a windmill. He successfully modified this instrument in to measure water currents and then foresaw the potential of this invention to drive ships through the water if provided with a suitable means of motive power.

Opinion, however, was still divided as to the most suitable propulsor configuration, as indeed it was to be for many years to come.

It comprises a propeller with a small number of blades driven by a horizontal shaft which passes into the hull below the waterline. There appears, however, to be no evidence of any trials of a propeller of this kind being fitted to a ship and driven by a steam engine. Using this technique Shorter managed to propel the transport ship Doncaster in Gibraltar and again at Malta at a speed of 1.

As a basis for his work he built a 25 ft long boat into which he installed a rotary steam engine and coupled this directly to a four-bladed propeller. Stevens later replaced the rotary engine with a steam engine of the Watt type and managed to attain a steady cruising speed of 4 mph with some occasional surges of up to 8 mph.

However, he was not impressed with the overall performance of his craft and decided to turn his attention and energies to other means of marine propulsion. In contra-rotating propellers made their appearance in France in a design produced by Monsieur Dollman.

He used a two-bladed set of windmill type propellers rotating in opposite directions on the same shaft axis to propel a small craft. Following on from this French development the scene turned once again to England, where John Ericsson, a former Swedish army officer residing at that time in London, designed and patented in a propulsion system comprising two contra-rotating propeller wheels.

Each wheel comprised eight short, wide blades of a helical configuration mounted on a blade ring with the blades tied at their tips by a peripheral strap. In this arrangement the two wheels were allowed to rotate at different speeds, probably to overcome the problem of the different flow configurations induced in the forward and after wheels. Ericsson conducted his early trials on a 3 ft model, and the results proved successful enough to encourage him to construct a 45 ft vessel which he named the Francis B.

This vessel was fitted with his propulsion system and had blade wheels with a diameter of 5 ft 2 in. Trials were conducted on the Thames in the presence of representatives from the Admiralty and the vessel was observed to be capable of a speed of some 10 mph.

However, in his first design Ericsson placed the propeller astern of the rudder and this had an adverse effect both on the steerability of the ship and also on the flow into the propeller.

The Admiralty Board expressed disappointment with the trial although the propulsion results were good when judged by the standards of the day. It has been suggested that by around this time the US merchant marine had some forty-one screw-propelled vessels in operation. The development of the screw propeller depended not only on technical development but also upon the availability of finance, politics and the likely return on the investment made by the inventor or his backers.

Smith was rather more successful in these respects than his contemporary Ericsson. Francis Petit Smith took out a patent in which a different form of propeller was used, more akin to an Archimedean screw, but, more importantly, based on a different location of the propeller with respect to the rudder.

Smith, who despite being frequently referred to as a farmer had a sound classical education, explored the concepts of marine propulsion by making model boats and testing them on a pond.

From one such model, which was propelled by an Archimedean screw, he was sufficiently encouraged to build a six tonne prototype boat, the F P Smith , powered by a 6 hp steam engine to which he fitted a wooden Archimedean screw of two turns. The vessel underwent trials on the Paddington Canal in ; however, by one of those fortunate accidents which sometimes occur in the history of science and technology, the propeller was damaged during the trials and about half of it broke off, whereupon the vessel immediately increased its speed.

Smith recognized the implications of this accident and modified the propeller accordingly. After completing the calm water trials he took the vessel on a voyage down the River Thames from Blackwall in a series of stages to Folkestone and eventually on to Hythe on the Kentish coast: between these last two ports the vessel averaged a speed of some 7 mph.

On the return voyage to London, Smith encountered a storm in the Thames Estuary and the little craft apparently performed excellently in these adverse conditions. In March Smith and his backers, Wright and the Rennie brothers, made an approach to the Admiralty, who then requested a special trial for their inspection.

This vessel, which was laid down by Henry Wilmshurst and engined by George Rennie, was completed in It had a length of ft and was rigged as a three-masted schooner. The Archimedes was completed just as the ill-fated Screw Propeller Company was incorporated as a joint stock company. The Archimedes was powered by two 45 hp engines and finally fitted with a single turn Archimedean screw which had a diameter of 5 ft 9 in. After undergoing a series of proving trials in which the speed achieved was in excess of nine knots the ship arrived at Dover in to undertake a series of races against the cross-channel packets, which at that time were operated by the Royal Navy.

The Admiralty was duly impressed with the results of these races and agreed to the adoption of screw propulsion in the Navy.

In the meantime, the Archimedes was lent to Brunel, who fitted her with a series of propellers having different forms. Concurrent with these developments other inventors had introduced novel features into propeller design. In Lowes patented a propeller comprising one or more blades where each blade was a portion of a curve which if continued would produce a screw. The arrangement was equivalent to a pair of tandem propellers on a single shaft with each blade being mounted on a separate boss.

Indeed, this ship can be considered to be the first screw-propelled cargo ship. Also in Rennie patented a conoidal design in which he proposed increases in pitch from forward to aft of the blade; three-bladed helices and the use of skewback in the design.

Taylor and Napier, a year later, experimented with tandem propellers, some of which were partially submerged. This propeller is particularly interesting since it was developed to its final form from a series of model tests in which diameter, pitch, blade area and blade number were all varied. The first propeller in the series was designed with three blades each having a length of a third of a turn of a screw thread, thereby giving a high blade area ratio. Nevertheless, as the design evolved better results were achieved with shorter-length blades of around 22 per cent of a full thread turn.

The ship was built by Augustin Normand at Le Havre and the propellers were designed and manufactured in Manchester by John Barnes who also built the engines.

Although the ship was originally destined for postal service duties on the Mediterranean Sea, she was later acquired by the French Navy and deployed as a dispatch boat. The eventual propeller was manufactured from cast iron and rotated at rpm giving the ship a speed of 10—12 knots. Indeed, the original propeller designed by Brunel was subsequently modified since it had a tendency to break in service. Nevertheless, the pitch chosen was not dissimilar, in effective pitch terms, from that which would have been chosen today.

Although the original propeller was 16 ft in diameter, had six blades and was made from a single casting, the propeller which was finally adopted was a built-up wrought iron propeller, also with six blades but having a diameter of Subsequently she ran a race against her paddle half-sister, HMS Polyphemus.

A design study was commissioned in an attempt to study the various facets of propeller design and also to optimize a propeller design for Rattler ; by January some thirty-two different propeller designs had been tested. The best of these propellers was designed by Smith and propelled the ship at a speed of about nine knots.

This propeller was a two-bladed design with a diameter of 10 ft 1 in. During the spring of the Rattler ran a series of competitive trials against the paddle steamer Alecto. These trials embraced both free-running and towing exercises and also a series of separate sail, steam and combined sail and steam propulsion trials. By March the Admiralty was so convinced of the advantages of screw propulsion that they had ordered seven screw-propelled frigates together with a number of lesser ships.

In Joseph Maudsley patented a two-bladed propeller design in which the propeller could be lifted by a rope and tackle connected to a cross-head and which permitted the propeller to be raised to deck level. One year later HMS Blenheim , which had been built in , was fitted with a similar arrangement to that proposed by Maudsley when she was converted from sail to screw propulsion.

The following year, , he patented a further design in which the blades of a two-bladed propeller, when not working, could be turned into the plane of the shaft to reduce sailing resistance. Later, in , the Rev. Fothergill patented a self-feathering propeller which removed the need to raise the propeller when under sail.

In this design the blades were so arranged as to take up a position of least resistance when not being rotated. In John Fisher patented a two-bladed design with perforated blades.

These perforations were in the form of slots to disperse any air that may have been entrained on the blades. A year later Walduck patented a design which was intended to attenuate the centrifugal motion of water over the blade surfaces by introducing a series of terraces, concentric with the shaft, but each being greater in pitch than its inner neighbor.

This theme was returned to many times during the subsequent development of the propeller, one of the later developments being in where chordal plates were introduced into the blade design. Peacock, in , patented an auxiliary propeller in which each blade was built from iron plate and supported by a stay rod projecting radially from the boss.

Although accepted by the Navy, screw propulsion had not been universally accepted for seagoing ships in preference to paddle propulsion, as witnessed by the relatively late general introduction of screw propulsion by the North Atlantic Steamship companies. However, the latter part of the nineteenth century saw a considerable amount of work being undertaken by a great number of people to explore the effects of radial pitch distribution, adjustable blades, blade arrangement and outline and cavitation.

For example, in Hirsch patented a propeller having both variable chordal pitch, which we know today as camber, and variable radial pitch; as an additional feature this propeller also possessed a considerable amount of forward skew on the blades. A type of propeller known as the Common Screw emerged and this was the most successful type of propeller in use before The working surfaces of the blades were portions of helices cut-off by parallel lines about an eighth of the pitch apart and located on a small cylindrical boss.

With these propellers the blade chord lengths increase from root to tip, however, Robert Griffiths modified a blade of this type to have rounded tips and this was particularly successful. Indeed, the Admiralty, which had a number of Common Screws, reduced their broad tips by cutting away the leading corners and this resulted in significant reductions in vibration.

During this period of rapid development the competition between rival designers was great. In this case a one knot improvement was recorded on trial and similar results were noted when Hirsch propellers replaced other designs.

At the same time a four-bladed, This propeller was a built-up design with the blades bolted through slots to permit adjustments to the blade pitch.

The ship attained a speed of In the s Hirsch also introduced the idea of bolted-on blades, thereby providing another early example of built-up propellers which achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the twentieth century. Thornycroft in designed a propeller with restricted camber in the mid-span regions of the blade and also combined this with a backward curvature of the blades in an attempt to suppress tangential flow.

Zeise carried the ideas of the development of the radial pitch distribution a stage further in when he increased the pitch of the inner sections of the blade in an attempt to make better use of the inner part of the blades. In parallel with the development of what might be termed fixed pitch propeller designs in the period through to about a number of inventors turned their attention to the potential for controllable pitch propellers.

In reality, however, a number of these designs would be better termed adjustable rather than controllable pitch propellers.

Bennett Woodcroft in patented a design with adjustable blades and this design had blades with increasing pitch from forward to the after edge in keeping with his earlier patent of

Marine Propellers and Propulsion

Marine Propellers and Propulsion, Fourth Edition offers comprehensive, cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects or anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with essential job knowledge. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consulting, research, design and technical investigation, John Carlton examines hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, the book is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data. Ignoreeri ja kuva leht. Alates Suurem pilt.

Cavitation is a detrimental phenomenon to ship operation s because it causes many losses. It caused some effects i. In that regard, this research conducts cavitation analysis on controllable pitch propeller CPP by varying number of blade i. Th e research method is carried out by the author in this study by conducting a simulation method based on the CFD approach. The s imulation process consists of 3 stage-post processor, solver manager, and post-processor. From the simulation based on the CFD approach result, it was found that propeller rotation has an effect on the pressure ratio value. As the propeller rotation increase, the value of the pressure ratio will increase as well.


The right of John Carlton to be identified as the authors of this work has been Carlton, J. S. (John S.) Marine propellers and propulsion. – 2nd ed. 1. Propellers.


MARINE PROPELLERS AND PROPULSION, 3RD EDITION

By John Carlton. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Bringing together a wealth of disparate information from the field, Marine Propellers and Propulsion provides comprehensive and cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects and anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with the knowledge needed to do the job. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consultancy, research, design and technical investigation, author John Carlton breaks the subject into three main sections - hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, Marine Propellers and Propulsion is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data.

Marine Propellers and Propulsion - J. Carlton [, PDF]. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications.

Marine Propellers and Propulsion

Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Bringing together a wealth of disparate information from the field, Marine Propellers and Propulsion provides comprehensive and cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects and anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with the knowledge needed to do the job. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consultancy, research, design and technical investigation, author John Carlton breaks the subject into three main sections - hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, Marine Propellers and Propulsion is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data. The most complete book available on marine propellers, fully updated and revised, with new chapters on propulsion in ice and high speed propellersGathers together otherwise disparate material on the theory and practice of propulsion technology from the past 40 years' development, including the latest developments in improving efficiencyWritten by a leading expert on propeller technology, essential for students, marine engineers and naval architects involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics. Markedets laveste priser.

The Encyclopedia of Maritime and Offshore Engineering EMOE provides an unparalleled major reference work covering the design, construction and operation of ships, offshore installations and other marine structures used for transportation, explor Du kanske gillar. Marine Propellers and Propulsion e-bok av John Carlton. Ladda ned. Spara som favorit.

Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consulting, research, design and technical investigation, John Carlton examines hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, the book is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data. Please login or register to download! Login Now Sign Up. Your email address will not be published. Skip to content.


Marine Propellers and Propulsion To Jane and Caroline Marine Propellers and in Publication Data Carlton, J. S. (John S.) Marine propellers and propulsion.


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Marine Propellers and Propulsion, Fourth Edition, offers comprehensive, cutting edge coverage to equip marine engineers, naval architects or anyone involved in propulsion and hydrodynamics with essential job knowledge. Propulsion technology is a complex, multidisciplinary topic with design, construction, operational and research implications. Drawing on experience from a long and varied career in consulting, research, design and technical investigation, John Carlton examines hydrodynamic theory, materials and mechanical considerations, and design, operation and performance. Connecting essential theory to practical problems in design, analysis and operational efficiency, the book is an invaluable resource, packed with hard-won insights, detailed specifications and data. Over a long and distinguished career he has authored more than a hundred technical papers and articles on marine technology, received numerous awards, chaired international committees and contributed to various government and naval initiatives on maritime matters. We are always looking for ways to improve customer experience on Elsevier. We would like to ask you for a moment of your time to fill in a short questionnaire, at the end of your visit.

 Присоединяются зарубежные налетчики! - крикнул один из техников.  - Уже обо всем пронюхали. Сьюзан отвернулась от экрана ВР к боковому монитору. На нем бесконечно повторялась видеозапись убийства Танкадо. И всякий раз Танкадо хватался за грудь, падал и с выражение ужаса на лице навязывал кольцо ничего не подозревающим туристам. В этом нет никакого смысла, - размышляла .

marine propellers and propulsion, second edition

Стратмор продолжал спуск.

Коммандер отпустил Сьюзан и повернулся к своему детищу стоимостью два миллиарда долларов. Глаза его расширились от ужаса. - Нет! - Он схватился за голову.  - Нет. Шестиэтажная ракета содрогалась.

Команда криптографов АНБ под руководством Стратмора без особого энтузиазма создала алгоритм, который окрестила Попрыгунчиком, и представила его в конгресс для одобрения. Зарубежные ученые-математики проверили Попрыгунчика и единодушно подтвердили его высокое качество. Они заявляли, что это сильный, чистый алгоритм, который может стать отличным стандартом шифрования. Но за три дня до голосования в конгрессе, который наверняка бы дал добро новому стандарту. молодой программист из лаборатории Белл по имени Грег Хейл потряс мир, заявив, что нашел черный ход, глубоко запрятанный в этом алгоритме.

Marine Propellers and Propulsion Second Edition_JS Carlton_2007

Он все еще катился по инерции и вскоре исчез в темноте. Сьюзан нашла свои валявшиеся на ковре итальянские туфли, на мгновение оглянулась, увидела все еще корчившегося на полу Грега Хейла и бросилась бежать по усеянному стеклянным крошевом полу шифровалки.

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